FAQ

Ads and Sponsorship


What’s the difference between Ads and Sponsorship?

Ads are audio messages recorded by the brand — or with help from Acast Creative — that run across a selection of shows depending on a number of criteria set by the advertiser (such as location, language and show genre). Where and when a specific ad should appear is determined in real time, based on individual show data combined with what we know about the listener.

Sponsorships are typically read and recorded by a podcast’s host(s), and are designed to feel more like part of the episode. They run only in a selected show, and appear within a specific slot (pre, mid or post).

Which should I choose?

If you’re looking for instant scale and advanced targeting, Ads are what you need — and you can supply your own audio or work with Acast Creative to make something listeners will love. If you want to align with a select show or podcast host, and to reach a more specific or niche audience, you should opt for Sponsorship.

Are podcast ads the same as radio ads?

While both are audio-based, that’s where the similarities end. Radio ads tend to be cluttered together in a commercial break, fighting for listener attention, and can’t be targeted beyond inferred station demographics.

Podcast ads, on the other hand, are given their own space and share of voice, with higher impact and engagement. They’re recorded and mastered to fit the podcast environment and listener behaviour — and they’re so welcomed by listeners that we’re always getting requests from people who want to hear them again.

What’s a campaign?

‘Campaign’ is the word we use to group an Ads or Sponsorship package. Campaigns have start and end dates, and all other information we need to know where your audio should play.

How much does podcast advertising cost?

We use CPM (Cost Per Mille) to price Ads and Sponsorships, meaning advertisers are charged per thousand impressions delivered. For example, if a campaign has a CPM of $20, an individual ad listen costs $0.02.

Check out acast.com/brands for more on Ads and Sponsorship.

Creating and submitting a proposal


What does ‘language’ mean when filtering shows?

This refers to the spoken language of the podcast.

What does ‘country’ mean?

This refers to the country the podcast is made in. This is where the podcast’s primary audience is likely to be, but there are always exceptions — for example, a podcast made in the UK may also have listeners in the US and Australia.

Why can I choose to select a gender skew or age range?

For some podcasts, demographic targeting categories have been set based on audience data, user surveys and information from the podcasters themselves — meaning we know that specific shows are predominantly listened to by either a male or female audience, and which age range it’s most popular with.

Selecting, for instance, to skew towards a male audience, would result in only seeing shows that have this category set — and the same is true for selecting, for example, shows that reach 18-24 year olds. Selecting specific age groups or gender skews will give fewer results — including the omission of any shows that have no gender or age group assigned — but there’s also the option to leave these filters empty.

What am I committing to by sending a proposal to Acast?

Nothing. There’s no commitment and no charges or hidden costs, and you can change your mind at any time.

What happens once I press ‘submit’?

You’ll receive confirmation of your proposal, with a Media Kit telling you more about your chosen market. Once we’ve received your proposal, an Acast representative from your local market will be in touch — usually within 48 working hours.

I’m interested in

Ads

Reach the right audience, in the right way, at the right moment

Select your target audience and campaign parameters, and choose the podcasts that meet your needs

I’m interested in

Sponsorship

Brand messages delivered by trusted, unique voices

Take a closer look at the podcasts that reach your target audience, and get started on your sponsorship journey

or click here if you're not sure